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Manama City

(Manama, Arabic Al-Manāmah, capital and largest city of Bahrain)

Bahrain’s capital Manama has been at the crossroads of desert trade in the Persian Gulf for centuries. Today, it’s a prosperous business and economic center in the Middle East, and offers visitors a shopping paradise with a fantastic dining, arts, and entertainment scene to be explored.

History of Manama City

Manama, Arabic Al-Manāmah, capital and largest city of Bahrain. It lies at the northeast tip of Bahrain island, in the Persian Gulf. About one-fifth of the country’s population lives in the city. First mentioned in Islamic chronicles about 1345 CE, it was taken by the Portuguese (1521) and by the Persians (1602). It has been held, with brief interruptions, by the ruling Āl Khalīfah dynasty since 1783. Because Bahrain concluded a series of treaties (1861–1914) placing the country under increasing British protection, there was a British political agent stationed at Manama from 1900, subject to the political resident for the Persian Gulf, whose headquarters were long at Būshehr, Iran. In 1946 the residency was moved to Manama, where it remained until the city became the capital of independent Bahrain in 1971.

Long an important commercial centre of the northern Persian Gulf, Manama had a traditional economy based on pearling, fishing, boatbuilding, and the import trade. Harbour facilities were poor, and ocean vessels had to anchor in the open roadstead 2–4 miles (3–6 km) offshore. The discovery of petroleum on Bahrain in 1932 revolutionized the city’s economy and appearance, with the construction of many modern buildings. Manama developed as a trade, financial, and commercial centre; it is the seat of numerous banks. The headquarters of the Bahrain Petroleum Company (BAPCO), however, are at ʿAwālī, in the centre of Bahrain island. Manama was declared a free port in 1958, and the deepwater port facilities of Mīnāʾ Salmān, in the protected bay of Al-Qulayʿah Inlet, southeast of the built-up area of the city, were opened in 1962. With storage and refrigeration facilities and equipment for docking and repair of large oceangoing vessels, it is now one of the most important ports of the Persian Gulf. The island and town of Al-Muḥarraq, Bahrain’s second largest community, lies just northeast; the two cities are linked by a causeway 1.5 miles (2.5 km) long. Pop. (2001) 143,035.

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